Aesthetic Medicine

AMSL - PRP
regenlab - PRP
Frequently Asked Questions: PRP for Aesthetic Medicine

Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) has been utilized in aesthetic medicine (UK, Japan, and Asia, Europe) to rejuvenate and slow down the aging process and face (1). This refers to mesenchymal and epithelial rejuvenation by application of the persons own enriched autologous plasma. Recently, ACR-PRP has been pioneered for facial rejuvenation in select patients with chronological aging, and solar damage. Regeneration or anti-aging by biological stimulation of resident stem cells by growth factors.

Science supports the use of PRP for the augmentation and regeneration of hard and soft tissues. PRP is the source of concentrated platelet content present in blood. Apart from assisting blood clotting, platelets also release growth factors that assist the human body to repair itself by stimulating cells to regenerate new tissue. Today, platelet rich plasma can easily be separated from blood, through a process of centrifugation. Using your enriched plasma permits the body to heal faster and more efficiently. Because your plasma (autologous) is used, there is no danger of disease transmission, anaphylaxis or neoplasia. In general medicine, platelet transfusion is common practice in treating blood platelet disorders, including very low counts associated with bleeding.

Case studies reported in Europe, England, Asia, Japan and South Africa have demonstrated consistent rejuvenation of facial aging, including wrinkling in persons with modest grades of photo- or chronological aging. Patient selection is important and skin diseases have to be excluded. Improvement of skin texture and tone can be expected, these features are noticeable within 3 weeks, and the process can be enhanced by addition of appropriate Cosmeceutical. Benefits include non-allergenic properties and ease of administration.

For practitioners in PRP injections for aesthetics medicine, please contact Nicole Bukovinsky on 0448022818.

References
1. Eppley BL. Platelet-rich plasma: A review of biology and applications in plastic surgery. Plast Reconstr Surg 118: 147e, 2006